Studs

How much weight can a steel stud wall support?

The capacity of a stud depends on many variables. The stud size, height, gauge, bracing condition, and lateral load (wind) will all have an effect on the stud capacity. A structural engineer should be consulted to determine a metal stud wall capacity.

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What’s the difference between a structural and non-structural metal stud?

A structural stud is meant for use to resist environmental loads (dead, live, wind, snow, or earthquake). They usually have wider flanges and thicker galvanizing. Non-structural studs or ‘interior’ studs are meant for non-load bearing demising walls with gypsum sheathing.

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Can metal studs be used as load bearing?

Yes. Structural studs can be used to support axial loads. However, non-structural (interior) studs should not be used in load-bearing applications.

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How thick is a 20-ga metal stud?

Studs guages/thicknesses are as follows: 12ga/0.097”, 14ga/0.068”, 16ga/0.054”, 18ga/0.043”, and 20ga/0.

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How do you read a stud size?

The Steel Stud Manufacturer’s Associates (SSMA) has adopted a sizing standard that moves away from ‘gauges’ and directly specifies the material thickness in mils (100ths of an inch). A 600S162-54 is a 6-inch (600) Stud (S) with a 1-5/8” flange (162) with a thickness of 0.054 in (54).

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What are standard metal stud sizes?

Studs are commonly available in the following sizes: 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 5.5, 4, 3.625, 3.5, 2.5, and 1.625 inches. The most popular stud sizes are 6 and 3.625 inches. A stud or track can be rolled to any requested dimension for an additional fee and lead time.

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How are cold-formed steel studs/track manufactured?

Large ‘coils’ of sheet steel are loaded into machines that first slice the steel into the necessary widths. A 600T125-43 track would be cut into something close to 8-1/2” wide. These smaller strips are rolled into smaller coils and fed into a rolling machine.

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